Thursday, July 21, 2011

Vineman Ironman 70.3 - Run Leg: What Happened to My Beautiful Plan?

As someone who's run more than 40 half marathons, I was confident that I'd be fine on the run. Hubris! I was okay on the first three miles, but then I started to get a tummy ache from the Gatorade. That's when I did something boneheaded. I stopped taking Gatorade at the aid stations. With the broken bike, my race had gone on nearly an hour longer than I expected and you can't race unless you consistently replace electrolytes.

After awhile, my stomach ache subsidied, but the long uphill run in the afternoon sun just toasted me. By mile six I was cramping a bit, but I wasn't all that tired. For a long while, I could see a guy running behind me in the distance. When I walked he walked and when I ran he ran. I convinced myself to keep pushing for him, because I knew I was setting the pace for him. If I quit, so would he. Like I said. Moral support - rule legal and greatly appreciated.

After the turnaround, I ran into the tie-dye guy who talked me through the bike repair attempt. I'm not sure when I passed him, but he was still on the outbound leg of the run.  I ran over and hugged him.  I love you tie-dye guy!

It was slow going, but at least I was going until about mile 9.  That's when I started cramping horribly. I couldn't push off to run without my calves locking up entirely.  The last 3 miles of the course took me over an hour to walk.  I was losing so much time that I was afraid the course would close.  I decided that it was a public street and they couldn't force me off the course.  I'd finish that race even if they were done giving out finishers' medals and they'd all gone home.

Luckily, it didn't come to that.  I got to finisher's chute and there was Steve cheering for me.  Actually, the volunteers waved me into the wrong chute and it ended in a dead end.  Steve had to tell me to go under the rope and run to the actual finish line.

Ah, sweet relief and sweet victory.  Broken bike, crampy run, fear - you can all kiss my Finisher's Medal.  I did it!

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Vineman Ironman 70.3 - Bike Leg: Not Exactly As I Planned It

I got off to a smooth start which is something a lot of competitors can't say. Immediately after the bike mount line is a very short, sharp uphill. In my research, I learned that I should run up the hill and mount at the top of the hill. I did that weaving through people who were toppling over like dominoes on the incline.

I was going well when my shifter broke on mile 5. I was stuck in my big ring for 30 miles of rolling hills. I stopped once to try and fix it myself, but I was losing so much time that I decided to ride in the big ring. Vineman is endless rolling hills though the vineyards of Sonoma County. On every hill people passed me climbing blissfully in their small ring. Irritating. I decided that:

  1.  I was going to ride anyway. If I failed to finish, it wouldn't be because I quit. Big ring? Tough it out cupcake.
  2. I was going to get mechanical help to put the bike into the small ring at the aid station at mile 30. I'd use the small ring to climb Chalk Hill and then I'd manually move it to the big ring for the long descent. I felt good about my strategy, but lost at least 20 minutes at the bike mechanic at mile 30. Ouch. That hurt.

After climbing Chalk Hill, I stopped and moved my chain into my big ring. It fought me and the chain jammed. A really nice man in a tie-dye shirt stopped to talk me through the repair. It meant more to me than I can say that someone stopped their own race to cheer on another participant. As a competitor, you can't accept tools or assistance. Moral support is allowed and greatly, greatly appreciated.

Unfortuately, it was all for naught. As soon as I started pedalling, the bike went right back to the small ring. GRRR! I spent the nearly entire race slowed by using the wrong chain ring - big ring for climbing and small ring for descent. Plus, I lost a good 30-40 minutes on trying to fix it.

But here is the good news, as I was pedaling toward the bike finish, I realized I had conquered the bike leg. No matter what happened in the rest of the race, I was now officially a cyclist. A big part of the reason I wanted to do the triathlon was to conquer my fear of the bike because Steve loved riding. I did it!

As I came into the bike transition, I had to ride past people who were finishing their run. I did start in one of the last swim waves, so some of these people had started the race an hour and a half before I did. However, I also knew that my bike leg was ridiculously long due to the gearing and attempted repairs. It was crushing. Then I heard my friend Melissa cheer my name and it lifted my spirits.  There's nothing quite like seeing a friendly face on the course.

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Vineman Ironman 70.3 - Swim Leg: Exactly As I Planned It

After so much build up and stress, it was finally race day. Steve walked me to the start and stayed with me until my swim wave began.  I had jitters, but once my wave got into the water I felt absolutely calm and focused.

Vineman has the most beautiful swim that you can imagine. It's a picturesque mountain river and everywhere you look it's California redwoods and lush pine trees.  This photo is my race start and it doesn't do it justice.  It's absolutely stunning.

My stroke was even paced and relaxed. The one funny thing was that one swimmer kept smacking me. On the outbound leg she went exactly my pace and was constantly next to me and smacking. I finally got clear of her and thought that was the end of smacky-girl. On the return leg she would surge forward - smacking me on her way past, then fall back and smack me while she fell backward.

Finally, I caught the wake of one of the male competitors and rode his wave right to the swim finish.  As I headed into the transition zone I was sad to have the swim end, it was so incredibly fun and beautiful.

Monday, July 18, 2011

Vineman Ironman 70.3 - Pre-Race Jitters (now with more nausea!)

We planned to have 2 days in Sonoma before the race and two days after the race.  As my friend Chris said to me, “It’ll be this totally awesome vacation with one sucky day in the middle of it.”

2 days to Vineman:  On Friday, we drove the race course. These are winding, country backroads and Steve was in love with them.  He wanted to ride all of them. The bike course was a lot of rolling hills, but nothing I couldn’t handle.  Chalk Hill Road, which I had worked up in my head to an epic mountian climb, was nothing more than a mile long hill - challenging, but within my ability.  There were also a few sharp, technical turns.  In fact the course was so bendy it took us several hours to drive the 56 miles. We also drove the run course which made me far less happy.  It was rolling hills, but overall it was an uphill climb for the first 6 miles.  Not happy with that.  Not happy at all.  I was stressed out but no worse than I’ve been for the last few weeks - a combo of worried and teary.

1 day to Vineman:  The day before the race I was nearly sick with stress.  I wanted to vomit.  Constantly.

We planned to drive over to the transition 2 area to pick up our bikes and my race packet.  Vineman is a logistical challenge for participants because transition 1 is roughly twenty miles from transition 2.  That means you need to set up T2 the day before the race and get to T1 with your wetsuit and bike on race morning.

Steve planned to go for a bike ride while I went to the mandatory participant meeting.  At the last second, he decided to go the participant’s meeting with me. In the meeting I had the completely stoopid moment that I have before every race where I think, “I’m too fat; everyone else is fitter and better prepared than I am. I don’t belong here.”  It’s idiotic.  I trained my chubby butt to be here and I’m ready.

We picked up our bikes and I did my check ride.  I was less than a mile into my ride when I threw my chain. Fixed it; threw it again.  Fixed it again; threw it again.  Fixed it and, threw it a fourth time.  Finally nursed it back to Steve and Karl.  Karl is the owner of Velotranz, the company that shipped my bike.  Karl is also a master bike mechanic.  He spent the entire afternoon adjusting the shifting on my bike.  It was a series of fixes check rides and chain throws, complete with me being teary and sick.  (Oh, the fun!)  He stuck with it and he got my bike fixed.

At some point when Steve and Karl were working on my bike I headed in the T2 zone and dropped my gear in a pile.  I was pretty sure I wouldn’t be able to race and just dropped whatever I had in my bag: running shoes, a few Gu’s, my water bottle...I don’t know.  Frustrated, frightened, and bikeless is no way to set up your transition zone.

Finally, we grabbed some dinner and headed home.  Ready or not, race day comes.

Thursday, July 14, 2011

The Most Specialest Chain Ring Bolt in all the World

Before every race I go through a period where I hate my gear.  I fret that my sneakers will give me blisters, my bra will chafe and my water bottle is too big.  Being a triathlete brings this to a whole new level of angst - my wetsuit, my pedals, my cleats.  In the past 10 days, I've stressed out about them all.

The one exception is my bike; I love my bike.  Unfortunately, it's been an endless source of hassles for poor Steve.  When I said I wanted a triathlon ready mixte, I thought I was asking Steve to find me a something unique, but within the Earthly realm.  What I didn't know was that it would be an endless pursuit of esoteric bike parts from thirty years ago - special cranks shipped here from France, special everything.  I wasn't just asking Steve to find me a unicorn.  I was asking Steve to find me the one unicorn that breathes rainbows and farts out glitter.  And he did it.

Last night, at 10pm he was doing his final check on the unicorn-bicycle.  We needed to give the bike to the transport company today at noon.  I'm not good at bike maintenance and Steve was dutifully making sure every item was in perfect working order.

Then.
It.
Happened.

He was ratcheting down a loose nut on my spectacular Stronglight chain ring and the bolt broke in half.  This is a Very Special bolt and the bike wasn't safe to ride without it because the chain rings might...I don't know, self destruct or immolate or something.  Steve was devastated because he knew that bolt was pretty much irreplaceable.

Emergency emails to our local bike shop owner followed. (Heart you Velocult!)  In the end, Steve had to rip apart one of his favorite bikes to give me a safe and suitable crank for the big climbs.  Velocult was nice enough to do some final emergency work on my bike so we could meet the transportation company deadline.

We made the noon bike transport with minutes to spare.

Saturday, July 09, 2011

Heat Training

When I signed up for the Vineman race, I assumed that Northern California would be much cooler than Southern California.  Wrong.  Vineman is one of the hotter races in the Ironman calendar.

Like most larger people, I suffer more in the heat than skinny minnie athletes.  For the last few weeks, I've been trying to do my long runs and rides in the heat.  Last weekend on Saturday, I went for a 15 mile run in the sweltering heat starting at 1pm.

On Sunday, my husband, Steve, volunteered to accompany me on a training ride in the midday heat.  The only person who dislikes the heat more than I do is Steve.  About 5 miles in, we started pedaling up the hill on the Route 52 bike path.  Pssst.  I got a flat.

The 52 bike path is brutally hot and there is no shade. Steve can change a flat in under a minute.  Of course, I need to know how to change a tire myself.  I'd done it once before, but it took me a long while to complete the task.  And poor Steve stood there baking in the sun while I completed a Slo-Mo tire change.

I finally had the tire changed and we continued our ride.  We got less than 10 feet and Pssst.  Now Steve had a flat.  I offered to change it for him, but he declined.  It's a shame, I bet I could've change that second tire in under 20 minutes.

Friday, July 08, 2011

Test Ride of Buttockal Endurance

At the Beginner's Triathlon I learned that one of the local training facilities was hosting a Vineman CompuTrainer ride.  I didn't know what a CompuTrainer was, but thought I should probably give it a try.

The CompuTrainer allows you to ride the course on a spin trainer.  They've programmed the entire course - every hill and valley - into the trainer.   The computer factors in your weight (ouch!) and your riding style.  On the trainer is there's is absolutely no coasting.  You can't rest at all on the downhills; you've got to pedal the entire route.  The coach leading the session said the CompuTrainer is about 20% harder than a real ride because there's no rest.

You're probably thinking that this must be incredibly boring.  You are so right! It was a grind of riding - no scenery, no wind, nothing.  Just 6 people pedaling and staring at the computer screen.

In addition to the mind numbing there is butt numbing. The bike is locked in position and you never get to move on the seat.  I don't care how much chamois butter you slap on, 4 hours locked on the bike seat hurts.

I started the session with 6 other riders.  When we hooked up my bike, I realized there was a problem with the shifting.  It would not go into my big ring. Craptastic!  I decided to ride anyway; if my shifting didn't work on race day I'd tough it out in my small ring.

About an hour into the ride the computer crashed.  You're kidding me, right?  Nope, we had to  restart and reride the entire first hour.  One of the riders bailed right there.  I didn't really blame her.

I toughed it out - no big ring, restart, boredom and butt pain.  It'll be worth it if I finish Vineman.

Thursday, June 30, 2011

Yep!

A little reminder from the folks at Geekfill.

Sunday, June 26, 2011

Race Notes: Beginner's Triathlon

Last Saturday I did the beginner's triathlon hosted by the Tri Club of San Diego. I cannot say enough good things about the Tri Club - fun, professional and supportive of triathletes of all abilities. There are weekly club races, tons of workouts and great sponsor discounts. This race was actually a free race for members.  The club wants you to have a chance to learn and make mistakes.  Love, love, love the Tri Club.

Since I've been training a lot on my own, this was my first chance to put it all together in a race event.   It was a short course on familiar training grounds.

Pre-race:   This was my first swim in my new wetsuit. Wetsuits may not be allowed at Vineman. It depends on the water temperature. I didn't want to train in a wetsuit and then get slayed if wetsuits were ruled out. I managed to put on my wetsuit in public without too much struggle.  I'm a big fan of the plastic bag trick to get it on over the feet.  (I learned that from Chris McCormack, Ironman World Champion.  If it's good enough for Chris...)

Swim: I stepped into the mushy, low tide shore and sank 6 inches. I spent a few minutes convincing myself to not be grossed out by the oozing mush. My new mantra is, "It's chocolate pudding. They lined the ocean with chocolate pudding."

Then the gun went off and I started swimming and panicking. Big time race jittering panic. Jumpin' junebugs on pogo sticks! Why? I'm a strong swimmer in a buoyant friggin' wetsuit. One of the swim buddies (thanks Tri Clubber!) helped me calm myself.  Once I had myself calm, the swim was fine.

Here's what I learned on the swim.  I can to do a better job of sighting as I round the buoy..  Also, my shoulders did tire out from the wetsuit. I need to do more swimming in neoprene.

Transition 1: Doh! Timing chip got caught on the wetsuit. Time lost while I unraveled that snag.

Ride: Easy breezy on the pancake flat Silver Strand. No issues.

Transition 2: A smooth grab and go.  I'm off to the run.

Run: I got caught up in running with people and over did it on the pace. I need to set some alarms on my Garmin to tell me when I'm going too fast. Otherwise, I get over-eager and run myself out of gas.

Post race:  The Tri Club eats like Rock Stars.  The post race buffet was: pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, bread pudding, yogurt, granola, berries, bananas, oranges, coffee, juices...did I mention this was a free race?  Thanks Tri Club!  I took yogurt, granola and fruit, because it would have been really easy to over eat with all that food after a short race.

Overall, a successful, short race.  I can do this.

Monday, June 13, 2011

Sign Up Sunday

I had a great bike ride with my husband yesterday.  Great, other than one episode of whining as we climbed a really tough hill. (I was whining; he's a climbing superstar.)

When I got home I felt a bubble of confidence or something...I signed up for the San Diego Tri Club's beginner's "race" next Saturday.  And I signed up for California Ironman 70.3.

Crazy.

Sunday, June 12, 2011

Reassess and Move Onward

Since I began this training plan, I've missed 4 workouts.  That's not bad for 7 weeks.  Well, except that 3 of those workouts were in the last week.

What happened?  Last week we were in Lake Tahoe on Sunday which is the day I normally map out my training sessions on my weekly calendar.  I traveled directly from Tahoe to work at my LA office on Monday and Tuesday.  That meant I never got around to scheduling  my training sessions until Wednesday.

Considering that I worked for Day-Timers and have read every time management book on the planet, I sure suck at managing my calendar.  My work requires that I spend a lot of time in meetings.  If I don't block out time then every morning, lunch and evening will be filled by an appointment.  If I want to have 2 consecutive hours available to train I need to protect that time.   Duh.  This isn't quantum mechanics.

Lesson learned.  Training happens when schedule it.  It doesn't miraculously fit into may day.  As much as I hate schedules, I need to plan.

Saturday, June 11, 2011

What Happened?

Lake Tahoe decided to dump some really bad weather on America's Most Beautiful Bike ride.  When Steve opened the hotel room door at 5 AM on race morning, my first thought was "It smells like snow."  If you grew up somewhere snowy, you know that before it snows the air smells....snowy.  It's hard to explain, but it's a specific scent.  I was worried about Steve and cycle team  getting pelted by snow, sleet and ice as they rode 100 miles up and down mountains.

The team went out to ride and I went back to bed.  When I woke up, the weather was marginally better and much warmer. I decided to go for my planned 2 hour run.  I ran out past the finish line and spent the next two hours running up and down the last few miles of the course cheering for cyclists as they finished.  The riders were freezing, exhausted and filthy from road splash and they smiled to see someone cheering their efforts.  I was the only person cheering on that lonely stretch of  road - especially when the sky opened up and dumped freezing cold rain on me for 30 minutes.  The cyclists had appropriate rain/cold weather gear.  Not me, I was in tri-shorts and a sleeveless running dress. It was chilly, but I love cheering for people and decided to stay out to finish my run.  

After that run I felt confident.  I ran over 13 miles and I felt that my triathlon was going to be easy.  For some nonsensical reason, I've been really worried about the run portion of the race.  A solid, long distance run totally boosted my confidence.  Unfortunately, that confidence surge didn't last.  Since then I've had a bunch of lackluster workouts and my confidence is gone.  

Saturday, June 04, 2011

Lake Tahoe Edition

I'm in Lake Tahoe with my husband's cycling team.  He's coaching for Team in Training this season. Tomorrow is a huge day for TNT - 1500 cyclists will ride one hundred miles around Lake Tahoe and thousand of runners and walkers will do the San Diego Rock N Roll marathon.   Every year those cyclists and marathoners raise millions to cure blood cancers.  I'm incredibly proud of our TNT participants, mentors and coaches.

Of course, tomorrow morning I'm going to be terribly jealous since this is not my event.  Event day is so special. Tomorrow I'm gear girl, cheerleader and finish line welcome committee.  But I'm not a participant. Sigh.

My own triathlon training is coming along well.  I feel strong and I running much better and faster than I have in the past.  When we got to Tahoe yesterday, I ran fast for over an hour - at 6200 feet over sea level.  That would have been impossible before I started this training.

Tomorrow, I've got a two hour run and then I'm support crew for the cyclists.  Soon enough, it'll be my event day.

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Recovery Week - Oh How I Loved Thee!

Last week was recovery week and I needed it.  I was still working out, but an hour a day, sometimes less.  Good times.

My body is still needing gobs of sleep.  I think that's partly getting older and partly just diggin' my mattress time.  I feel so bad for Steve, because he gets much less sleep than I do.  I'm absolutely the queen of mean when I don't get enough rest.  Workout?  Not unless you count throwing a fit.

With 8 weeks to go, this whole half Ironman thing is starting to seem like a realistic goal.  I could actually do this race within the allowed time frame.  I'm trucking along on the training plan, picking off each workout.  And every workout - even the tough ones - is a confidence builder.  

Me, a Iron Distance Triathlete.  Imagine that.

Monday, May 16, 2011

Bike Week Completed

Put another long training week into the books.  This was bike week.

For several weeks I've been telling Steve there was something wrong with my handle bars since I've had consistent pain in the muscle under my right shoulder blade.  I couldn't figure it out - bars too low, bars uneven?  Steve thought it was probably my posture on the bike.

Steve and I went out for a ride yesterday to check my bike fit.  As we were getting our bikes ready to ride I really looked a handle bars.  My left brake lever/hood was very slightly rotated inward.  Stevie muscled it to the right spot.  VoilĂ !  No more back pain.  After watching me ride, he also raised my bike seat.  That helped a lot and I'm getting a lot more power on the climbs.

This is recovery week.  Oh, yeah.  I've got a long run on Saturday, but that's my only "all out" workout this week.  I'm very, very excited to have a nice, light training load.

Monday, May 09, 2011

Three Weeks Down, Ten to Go

I'm officially through week 3 of the Half Ironman plan. In the last 21 days, I've been rock solid on training. I did miss the biking section of my workout yesterday, because it was rainy. That's the only miss in the last 3 weeks..

Here is what I've learned so far:

Treat each week as a unit.  I can shift around workouts during the week, but there's no working ahead into next week or carrying over missed workouts. Every Sunday night, I hang the new week's training calendar on the fridge. Every Sunday is a victory and every Monday is a fresh start.

Sunday must be a rest day. I've been trying to use Thursday as my rest day because I need to commute round trip to Burbank. That ends up being a 14 hour workday which starts at 5:30 AM. There's no way I can do a workout on Thursday. Guess what, a 14 hour workday is not restful and recuperative. I need Sunday Funday for my own mental health. I can do a swim or a bike ride with my husband, but I can't do some mega-workout.

Get enough sleep. Right now, I need between 8 and 9 hours of sleep each night. When I'm not in full training I need about 6 or 7 hours. I'm incredibly fortunate that I can telecommute some mornings. I can sleep until 7:45 then immediately start working at 8. When other people take their lunch break, I commute to the office (a whole 3 miles!)

Not everyone can be supportive. No one can always be supportive. And that's okay.

Thursday, May 05, 2011

Finishing the Swimming Week

My occasional, nagging worry is that I'm simply not training enough to complete a half Ironman.  How is working out for two hours a day going to prepare me for a seven hour race?

On Sunday, I figured it out.  This training plan works in week long blocks.  For one week you do a specific workout repeatedly without days off for recovery.  Last week it was swimming.  That's fun on Monday and Tuesday.  Then the daily fatigue accumulates and by the end of the week, you're training on some tired muscles.  

On Sunday, I swam the slowest two mile swim in the history of universe.  It took me over an hour. I was swimming every lap almost 12 seconds slower than I swam earlier in the week.  But I completed it and trained through the fatigue.  That's what's getting me prepped for race day.

The swim took so long, that my SPF100 Sport sunscreen washed away.  Now I have a butt like the Coppertone baby.

Thursday, April 28, 2011

Gear Guide - Fingertip Lap Counter

Training Plan 
 I Did               
Swim:
Warm-Up:
200 Swim
200 Kick
200 Pull


Main Set:
16 X 50
Speedwork


Cool Down:
200 Easy

Swim:
Warm-Up:
200 Swim
200 Kick
200 Pull

Main Set:
16 X 50
Speedwork

Cool Down:
200 Easy
Workout Time: 
40 minutes
Total Time: 
120 minutes           
One of the things I like about swimming is the oasis of calm in the pool.  No one bugs you.  No one wants to talk.  You can't hear or see your Crackberry.  It's like mediation time for me.  Unfortunately, I get lost in my thoughts and I forget to count my laps.


Speedo Aqualap to the rescue.  People seem to dislike this product on Amazon, but it's been awesome for me.  It's super easy to operate in the water and you don't need to stop swimming to count a lap.  It's very easy and intuitive to use.  You just tap it with your thumb while you're swimming.  Another nice thing is it has a little chime that you can hear underwater.  That chime lets you know that you did, in fact, count that lap.   Plus, I can easily read the screen underwater and see how lightenin' fast that last lap was.  (No more stopping and pulling off my goggles to see the timer clock.)  The downside is that the band isn't adjustable.  Either this is going to fit you or not - no adjusting.  I can't imagine that it would work for someone with large or petite hands.

Final verdict: You don't need this, but it's nice to have.  It lets you go on autopilot in the pool and then go home and analyze your lap data.

Training notes. Yesterday my shoulders finally protested the mile-a-day swimming.  When I hit the pool, my shoulders were tired.  I powered through my laps, but I'm looking forward to my rest day today.

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Swim Weeks - As Good As Anticipated

Monday
Training Plan 
 I Did               
Swim:
Warm-Up: 
4 x 150
Main: 
1650 ladder   
Cool Down:
Swim:
Warm-Up: 
4 x 150
Main: 
1650 ladder   
Cool Down:
Workout Time: 
40 minutes
Total Time: 
60 minutes      
Tuesday
Training Plan 
 I Did               
Swim:

Warm-Up: 
400
Main: 
9x100 (EBEH) 
Cool Down:
6x25


Bike:
60 Minutes 
Hills



Swim:
Warm-Up: 
400
Main: 
9x100 (EBEH) 
Cool Down:
6x25

Bike:
60 Minutes 
Hills
Workout Time: 
100 minutes
Total Time: 
140 minutes           
As I expected, I'm just loving swim training week.

Swimming is the one workout I'm always sad to see end. When I finish a long swim I'm always so bummed to have to get out of the pool. Unlike running, where I'm always, always happy to wrap up a run.

As an added bonus, today while I was swimming the Senior Citizens Synchronized Swimming team was practicing.  You haven't lived until you've seen a bunch of ladies in flowered swim caps do the oyster flip.  All kidding aside, that's the type of senior citizen I want to be - healthy and still learning new stuff.  And I want to be doing jazzhands!

Once I finish the ultramarathon, I'm going to find some endurance swims to do - that Alcatraz swim or something like that.  It seems like a waste to love swimming so much and not do it all the time.

Sunday, April 24, 2011

Week 1 - Complete

Week 1 of Half Ironman training is complete!  Woo Hoo and Go Me.

It was a lot of hours set aside for training and it wasn't perfect.  I had a business trip, so I did 2 long hours on a stationary bike in a hotel gym.  Boring, but I did it.

Also, I rode my bike today for a windy hour on Fiesta Island.  A few years ago I had a meltdown because I thought the gusts would blow my bike over, but it didn't really bother me today.  I still need to work a bit on descending hills, because I'm a big ol' fraidy cat, but I rode with confidence today.

Starting tomorrow, I'm in "Swim Training Week".  I love to swim and of course, I'm overjoyed.  A week of little running, little cycling and swimming everyday.  It'll be like every summer of my childhood.

For the record, here are the rest of the this weeks training plans and actuals.

Training Plan 
 I Did               
Bike:
2 Hour -
Moderate Pace 

Run:
30 Minutes
Recovery Pace
Bike:
2 Hour -
Moderate Pace 

Run:
30 Minutes
Recovery Pace
Planned Time: 
150 minutes
Actual Time: 
160 minutes           








Training Plan 
 I Did               
Swim:
Warm Up
400
Main Set
10X100
Alternate speed
Cool Down
150 

Run:
90 Minutes
Easy Pace

Swim:
Warm Up
400
Main Set
10X100
Alternate speed
Cool Down
150 

Run:
90 Minutes
Easy Pace
Workout Time: 
130 minutes
Total Time: 
160 minutes           

Training Plan 
 I Did               
Bike:
1 Hour -
Moderate Pace 

Run:
30 Minutes
Recovery Pace
Bike:
1 Hour -
Moderate Pace 

Run:
30 Minutes
Recovery Pace
Planned Time: 
90 minutes
Actual Time: 
170 minutes         

Friday, April 22, 2011

An Example of Time Suction

Here is a perfect example of how all the preparation stuff can be a black hole of time.

Training Plan 
 I Did               
Swim:

Warm-Up:
2 x 150
Main Set: 
3 x 500, 
1 is RPE 3, 
2 is RPE4, 
3 is RPE 5
Cool Down
150 easy



Weight Lifting:
30 Minutes


Swim:
Warm-Up
2 x 150
Main Set: 
3 x 500, 
1 is RPE 3, 
2 is RPE4, 
3 is RPE 5
Cool Down
150 easy
Planned Time: 
40 Minutes


Training Time: 
70 minutes
Prep Time:
30 minutes           
Steve broke a spoke on the wheel of his hill climbing bike. Since he needs that bike for this weekend, I took the wheel to the bike shop for him. It should have taken 5 minutes to drop off the wheel and ask them to rebuild it. Except it's a special wheel that they need to send out for rebuild and that would take a few weeks.

Okay, I asked if they could just replace the spoke. Unfortunately, this special wheel has very special spokes.  The guys at the bike shop sorted through boxes and boxes of spokes and couldn't find one to match.  Oh, and to order the special, special spoke for the special wheel?  There's only one vendor and he's super slow.  That order will take a few weeks too.  After an hour, I left the bike shop with a broken wheel and no clear path to get it fixed.

If you include driving to bike shops and phone calls,  it probably took us 4 hours to get that spoke replaced. 

Training Notes: Yesterday was my second long swim of the week.  I'm completely stoked about swimming a mile without fatigue, especially considering the 8 months I took off from swimming.  The the weight training I did in the off season really pays off when I swim.  I could have easily swam a second mile without fatigue in my back and shoulders.

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Despite Watching Dr. Who, I'm Not A Time Lord

Training Plan 
 I Did               
Bike:
1 Hour -
Easy Pace 

Run:
30 Minutes
Haulin' butt
Bike:
45 Minutes -
Easy Pace 

Run:
20 Minutes
Haulin' butt
Planned Time: 
90 minutes
Actual Time: 
120 minutes           
I'm using a training plan that says I'll be ready for a half Ironman with just 12 hours per week.

That, my friends, is a big lie.

It might only take 12 hours of actual training, but it takes time to pack your gym bag, drive to the gym, shower, get redressed.  That doesn't even start to count all the time spent on bike maintenance and shopping for cute triathlon suits.  It's not the training; it's all the stuff you need to do to prepare and recover from training that's a giant time suck.

Plus, sometimes you hit a time chomping snag.  Today, my gym bag was all packed, but when I got the gym I realized I forgot my running shoes.  I need those.  That meant a 30 minute round trip to fetch something that I'd put right next to my gym bag.

Time for me is very limited.  Whenever I screw up my preparation, that means time I need to chop that time out of my training.  I'm going to keep a tight watch on how much time this is taking.  It's time I take from my family, my work, volunteering (remember when I did that!).  That's not a reason to give up on this goal, but I want to be conscious about the decision.